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The place for wild birds.

There are six photos on this page:

1. Northern Mockingbird, hatchling

Northern Mockingbird, hatchling.

2. Northern Mockingbird, early nestling

Northern Mockingbird, early nestling.

3. Northern Mockingbird, mid-nestling

Northern Mockingbird, mid-nestling.

4. Northern Mockingbird, fledgling

Northern Mockingbird, fledgling.

5. Northern Mockingbird,
support feeding a released juvenile

Northern Mockingbird, support feeding a released juvenile.

6. Northern Mockingbird,
support feeding a released juvenile (close-up).

Northern Mockingbird, support feeding a released juvenile (close-up).

Related to the Gray Catbird and thought to be a member of the Thrasher family, the Mockingbird is known for its ability to mimic many different sounds.

Mockingbirds are generally solitary and often seen running on the ground foraging for bugs. They also eat berries, and sometimes suet.

This long-tailed bird is a pugnacious defender of its nest in summer! Mockingbirds nest in trees, bushes, or vines. Both the male and female build the cup-shaped nest out ot twigs, leaves and stems, lining it with rootlets and grass. The nest often includes paper, string, wool, and cotton.

Although appearing to be hardy, these birds are quite slim bodied, and can decline rapidly when sick or hurt. Nestlings grow very rapidly, have extremely long bluish gray legs, and are prone to nutritional problems in captivity unless the diet is correct.

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This website and all its contents belong to The Place for Wild Birds, Inc.
Copyright © 2002, all rights reserved. Reproduce only with permission.
All photographs by Walter S. Bezaniuk. Most illustrations by Kathleen Frisbie.
Site design by and some illustrations by Sara.